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Molecular Core



The Molecular Core supports the molecular analyses in all the ICEMR Malawi projects, with the aim of contributing to the rational design of malaria control and intervention activities.

Each of the ICEMR Malawi projects has a molecular component which is central to their specific aims. The core also aims to develop novel, field friendly assays to address malaria specific questions.

Additionally, the core aims to centralize the molecular facilities for different projects in order to eliminate the duplication of efforts and expensive equipment

Key Personnel of Core

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Dr. Karl Seydel (Core Leader)

 

Dr. Karl Seydel leads the Molecular Core. He is from Michigan State University but carries out his research in Malawi.

His main research interest is in the clinical heterogeneity of malaria disease, and aims to investigate on the causes of differences in Malaria severity, especially in children.

 

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Monica Soko
(Research Assistant)


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Priscilla Suleman
(Research Assistant)

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Flora Chirwa
(Research Assistant)

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Innocent Sulani
(Research Assistant)

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Alex Saidi
(Technician)

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Syze Gama
(Technician)


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Charles Ndovi
(Technician)


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Lissa Jamu
(Intern)


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Godfrey Mvula
(Technician)
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Andrew Nyambalo
(Technician)


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Chifundo Duster
(Technician)


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Hendrina Katalama
(Intern)


Core Location

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Molecular Lab

The molecular lab is based at the University of Malawi – College of Medicine. This is where molecular tests and analyses are done.
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Core Activities

  • We maintain a molecular parasitology laboratory facility based at the University of Malawi College of Medicine (COM) in Blantyre, that supports all ICEMR projects
  • We measure various malaria parasite characteristics, including growth rate and genetic complexity, in order to determine their influence on disease severity
  • We use molecular techniques to determine which infection characteristics are potentially infectious and which characteristics are associated with different levels of disease severity
  • We use molecular methods to measure the levels of asexual as well as sexual parasites and determine whether both male and female gametocytes are present (both are required to propagate infection)
  • We work with Project leaders and other collaborators and consultants to perform parasite and mosquito genotyping and to develop novel molecular and genomic based assays to address malaria specific hypotheses
  • We develop local capacity in molecular techniques by providing training to laboratory technicians, recruiting post-doctoral fellows, and providing internship opportunities to medical students
  • We develop novel field-friendly assays to for malaria diagnostics and prognostics